News from secretariat
WABA celebrates the 25th Anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Anwar Fazal, Chairperson Emeritus of WABA, stresses that “Breastfeeding is not just good health and good nutrition. It is good economics and good ecological practice. It is about food security and it is about human rights.” In conjunction with the 25thAnniversary of the CRC, WABA joins ILCA in calling for the ratification and implementation of this convention, and celebrates the development of the rights of the child. Click here for more information.

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) supports Consumers International’s call for a Global Convention to Protect and Promote Healthy Diets.
WABA supports recommendations made by Consumers International for a Global Convention, particularly its call to (a) increase awareness and education on nutrition, (b) strengthen control and restriction of advertising and promotion of unhealthy food and beverage products, and (c) ethical labelling, coding and advertising of food and beverage products. Click here for more information.

WABA Statement to the 2nd International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2)
The 2nd International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) will take place 19-21 November 2014, in Rome, Italy. The conference will convene high-level government officials and stakeholders with the overall goal of improving diets and raising nutrition levels through policies that more effectively address today’s major nutrition challenges.

The WABA has crafted a Statement with Call for Action to position breastfeeding as a crucial part of the nutrition debate. The WABA Statement to ICN2 asserts that the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding is a human right, and is a vital component of any concrete response that governments and relevant UN agencies intend to take in tackling the critical problems facing countries on nutrition.

This Statement has already been endorsed by WABA Core Partners and Allies: Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM), International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN), International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA), La Leche League International (LLLI), Wellstart International; the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI - University of North Carolina), the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM), the International Society of Social Pediatrics and Child Health (ISSOP), and the People's Health Movement (PHM).

WABA encourages your organisation to share this Statement widely within your networks, with partner NGOs/CSOs, and with your government contacts!
See FULL WABA Statement to ICN2 and Call for Action



World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) /La Leche League International (LLLI) Global Breastfeeding Peer Counsellor Programme
A new collaborative project between WABA and LLLI is being established. A WABA/LLLI Global Breastfeeding Peer Counselling Training Programme specifically geared to train Peer Counsellor Program Administrators is in the works.

The WABA/LLLI PCP trainings would target NGOs, organisations and individuals who would like to become Peer Counsellor Program Administrators to start a Peer Counsellor Programme in their part of the world. The programme will be based on a revised and updated version of the original LLLI material that has proved its worth since the 1980s.

Anne Batterjee, LLLI Board of Director, has been appointed as WABA Steering Committee member for Global position effective from 1st September 2014. With her long involvement with WABA work, Anne is a wonderful addition to the Steering Committee.



Right to Food and Nutrition Watch 2014
‘Ten Years of the Right to Food Guidelines: Gains, Challenges and Concerns’

Oct 8, 2014 - WABA announces the launch of the global Right to Food and Nutrition Watch 2014, dedicated to celebrating and critically assessing ‘Ten Years of the Right to Food Guidelines: Gains, Challenges and Concerns’ on the 10th Anniversary of the FAO Right to Food Guidelines.

“As a global alliance of individuals and organisations concerned with the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding, WABA asserts that breastfeeding has a vital role in making food security a reality for millions of babies born every year”, asserts Jay Sharma, WABA Executive Director. “While included in the Voluntary Right to Food Guidelines, current statistics show that breastfeeding rates are abysmally low across the globe due to a confluence of factors including aggressive marketing of breastmilk substitutes, and lack of political will and a reluctance to make resources available by governments” he argues.

This dire scenario is even more critical for countries ravaged by emergencies and disasters! “Disasters are not exceptional situations in which states are exempt from their responsibilities with regard to the right to adequate food and nutrition… During emergencies, support for exclusive and continued breastfeeding is absolutely critical for the health and lives of infants and young children”, argues WABA’s representative to the WATCH Consortium board, Dr Marcos Arana, in his co-written article for the WATCH 2014 report. “Donations and untargeted distribution of breast-milk substitutes and ready-to-use foods (RUFs), together with the distribution of globally marketed seed varieties, create dependence, discourage breastfeeding by interfering with women’s options to decide the best manner in which to feed their children, erode local food culture, and undermine food sovereignty”, he stresses.

See more at: WABA Advocacy Section

International Youth Day 2014
“Youth and Mental Health”



WABA International Youth Day Statement

The theme for International Youth Day for 2014 is “Youth and Mental Health”. WABA takes this occasion to reiterate that breastfeeding is an important factor that benefits child development and aids the wellbeing of both mother and child.

Read the full statement here



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The WABA Coordinated World Breastfeeding Week is part of the gBICS (Global Breastfeeding Initiative for Child Survival) Programme entitled: "Enhancing Breastfeeding Rates Contributes to Women's Rights, Health, and a Sustainable Environment". The gBICS Programme aims to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development - beyond the Millennium Development Goals - by scaling up breastfeeding and infant and young child interventions and transforming Policies into Practice which contributes to efforts aimed at addressing climate change and gender inequality in the framework of human rights. WABA is grateful to NORAD (the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation) for its support of gBICS.



News from around
DISAPPOINTING OUTCOMES OF NEGOTIATIONS ON NUTRITION
STATEMENT BY CSO DELEGATION TO THE OPEN ENDED WORKING GROUP OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUTRITION 2

Governments met in the FAO Headquarters in Rome from 10-12 October to finalize the Rome Political Declaration and the Framework for Action for the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2). After 22 years, civil society organizations (CSOs) were expecting significant progress to address the urgent problem of the more than 200 million children who suffer from acute and chronic malnutrition, the 800 million suffering from undernourishment and the 500 million adults with obesity. CSOs consider the outcomes of this negotiation to be totally inadequate to confront the root causes of malnutrition and call into question the lack of commitment of the States to make a real step forward in the fight against malnutrition in all its forms.

The ICN2 negotiations failed to recognize that the current hegemonic food system and agro-industrial production model are not only unable to respond to the existing malnutrition problems but have contributed to the creation of different forms of malnutrition and the decrease of the diversity and quality of diets. Unfair trade agreements, lack of investment in small-scale food production and support to agro business models, have led to displacement of small-scale producers all over the world. Marketing of ultra-processed products, high in energy, sugar and salt, has contributed to the surge of obesity in the world. At the same time, unethical practices by breastmilk-substitute producers continue to undermine the life-saving practice of breastfeeding. The conference also failed to recognize gender inequality and women’s rights violations (child marriage, adolescent pregnancy, violence against women, inter alia) as one of the root causes of women and child malnutrition.

How can we expect a political declaration based on such a flawed diagnosis to serve as the basis for an effective and coherent framework for action?

See Full CSO Delegation Statement here.

Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies
Infants and young children are vulnerable in any emergency. It is the position of the International Lactation Consultant Association that supporting their wellbeing should be a priority of governments, aid agencies, health workers, and members of the public. Such support should include assistance for exclusive and continued breastfeeding, safe artificial feeding where breastfeeding or provision of human milk is not possible, and appropriate complementary feeding for all infants and young children.

To read the full position paper on Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies from ILCA, please click here.

10 Years of the Right to Adequate Food Guidelines - Progress, Obstacles and the Way Ahead Civil Society Synthesis Paper for the 41st Session of the UN Committee on World Food Security

This paper is a product of a broad civil society consultation process, facilitated by the Global Network for the Right to Food and Nutrition, with the political support of the member organizations of the Civil Society Mechanism to the Committee on World Food Security.

Ten years ago, in November 2004, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) adopted the Voluntary Guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security (RtAF Guidelines). Initiated by civil society, negotiated in a collaborative process, and unanimously adopted by all FAO member states, the RtAF Guidelines represented hope for a greater consensus on what was needed to make the human right to adequate food and nutrition a reality for people on the ground. Indeed, by delineating clear steps on how states could implement the right to food, and further still how to take a holistic approach – one that recognizes the importance of legal entitlements, policy coherence, and participation of rights holders – the RtAF Guidelines were set to reshape food system governance.

But what happened in the last ten years? What trends and events have shaped the context in which the right to food must be implemented? What, if any, successes at implementation have been achieved at the national, regional, and global level? What obstacles and challenges have inhibited progress? And how do we move forward to ensure a world where every person and community can enjoy the right to adequate food and nutrition? To mark the 10th anniversary of the RtAF Guidelines, civil society and social movements contributing to the promotion and defense of the human right to adequate food and food sovereignty have embarked on a critical assessment of where we are now in the struggle for solidifying the human right to adequate food and nutrition and where we must go.

See ull Civil Society Synthesis Paper here

For more information also see: fian.org


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